Let's Make Robots!

PICkit2 programming and ICSP?

I need to implement this into my robot but I am not sure which circuit is the correct circuit to use.  I want to program the chip without removing it from

the circuit.I would obviously prefer the first one but if the second one is better then i would go for it. Please give some advice. 

 

  1.  Which one is better for ICSP?
  2. if i use the first one, do i need to remove the vpp line while running?
  3. What is so special about the ICSP circuit?  
SORRY FOR MY MISTAKE, THESE ARE THE DIAGRAMS I AM TALKING ABOUT
By the way, I will use a PIC16F690 OR PIC18F252(more likely) 
 

 mnl01_2.jpg

OR

 

385-probleme-pickit2-suggestion-constructeur.jpg 

 

 

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You've modified your description, but I'm afraid I still don't understand the question. You ask "Which one is better for ICSP?" but you only give one example and the example you give is the only way ICSP can be used.

The two diagrams you give above are BOTH required for ICSP. Your topmost one is the PicKit2 programmer itself and the bottom one explains how you attach it to your circuit.

 

I am a great advocate of ICSP. I use it in ALL my designs. If you're using the PicKit2, you don't need ANY additional components in your circuit - just a breakout header to connect the programmer.

The thing is that I don't use PicAXE. I'm not sure if you can ICSP with a PicAXE. I use Microchip's own free assembler.

Either way, PicKit2 is not an alternative to ICSP as your message seems to indicate. PicKit2 is a programmer, which is capable of ICSP.

PicAxe uses a bootloader (a little program which transfers your program into the pic) and as such, they can also be programmed without being removed from the circuit, but this is not the same as ICSP.

I can't see any circuits in your post pjnai... so I'll assume you're talking about the standard 5-wire ICSP setup. You normally do not need to remove the Vpp line before you test your robot - if you're using MPLAB you can turn Vdd supply on and off, and use Vpp to hold the chip in reset or release it whenever you want, which is very useful for debugging.

I'm not sure what WDV is, but if you want to implement ICSP, Microchip has made a guide to help build the ISCP circuit: http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/30277d.pdf

 There's also an instructable about understanding ICSP for PICs : http://www.instructables.com/id/Understanding-ICSP-for-PIC-Microcontrollers/