Let's Make Robots!

Work HERE on giving some of our robots emotions....

I am not sure why I decided to start this topic on thia area of the forum (other than the fact I REALLY enjoy my FEZZ Mini Robot!!!).

Do you want a robot that runs around the floor and its only job is to not collide with things (some robots do more)??? I want MORE than that! A rather simple simulation of emotion would be really cool and freak out your friends and neighbors!!! Its time for some AI !!!

Others, please join us and help this website do almost as much as some small AI laboratories have done.

Here is one thing I am working on. I use distance is divided up as a number for some base emotional "reflexes". Long range  - happy and maybe want to explore. Mid range - content with being but might consider going for long range. Short range - FEAR! I will do what I need to do to get back to Mid range. (Escape mode.)

With this broken up in ranges (I give each a number) I use these to control speed as well as other things. When I say maybe I am meaning the result will be partially based on random numbers. Maybe if it is Long - range I use random results to control if I speed up and get going. (Hopefully, the result will remain in Mid - range.) You can select any other variable that controls something your robot does that would help the robot look like its in the current mood.  (Technical: How do you make a robot shake?)

Your turn! Maybe your ideas include sounds or speach recognition or many other things you can think up.

I have some more ideas on how to add the "look and sound" of emotions but I want your ideas are.. (Please comtribute!)  One idea I had was to keep two copies of your robot software, one emotional and one plain.

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My fiancé sent this to me.  I don't know why someone would invent this.

http://youtu.be/vhHo6CUq4-o

(Through programming) "Desiree" has a definite place it wants to go, not a physical spot, just any location she can run free.I often use a "leash" to take Desiree for a walk (if not, she might go under my bed or into another room). When she doesn't get to go the way SHE wants she can cry,or just be stuborn and sit in place for a while. She has several other "interesting" behaviors as well.

(Flipping a software switch, once again she is "a box" roaming around avoiding objects.Desiree is "gone" for a while.

Anyone can write a little code to make their robot "behave" in a way they want it to. (Nobody has mistaken her for something living, there is just serious shock when she "misbehaves".)

I feel sort of like the creator of electromechanical "life" (I have no idea what this really qualifies as.nor does it make much difference.)

This is why I started this topic. Not to try to create "real" AI, just some light fun/easy programming. Try it!

I know this may not be relevant but it's worth a chuckle. My ultimate conception of a robot with emotions would be Wheatley from Portal 2. Here, have a look: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afHt_1sVQ14.

RATS! It looks like it really needs anti-gravity to work. I do read in robot and electronics magazines that the space station has 3 "robot  balls" floating around seeing if they might serve as helpers. The robots use tiny jet blasts to move around.

I heard about it too. It`s a school/group challenge. Students get to program and simulate these cubes.

My thoughts are that for a machine to have the slightest chance of being considered to have 'emotions', the observer has to identify with it in some way.   A machine can never to be said to have its own emotions; they are a superimposition by the observer.  The best way to get the 'involvement' is to give the robot some physical characteristics of something we normally would identify with, such as Oddbot has done with his brilliant puppy.  Once that initial connection is made then the observer will interpret the robot's actions as they would a living creature.

A simple example : I showed 'Blinky' my toothbrush bristlebot to my (non-technical) colleagues at work  They loved it and there were comments like 'Isn't he cute' and 'Ahhhh, he's fallen over'.  A couple had seen it before I added the googly eyes and there was nowhere near the same interest in it. A daft example maybe, but it was interesting how people's reactions changed once it looked a bit more animal like.

As others have suggested, 'personality' is a much better goal, although a few anthropomorphic traits are going to help tremendously.  I'd try and reduce periods of constant speed movement.  Much more creature-like if a robot hesitates and changes course a bit.  Also pauses every now an again to look around. 

Noises would be a good bet too; So much can be conveyed just with a few tones, which are effectively 'triggers' to call up certain learned neural responses from the observer's mind.  Imagine a series of rising tones - 'whoops' for elation, a falling pair of tones; 'eh ohhhh' for that 'oh dear' feeling, a querying mid-low-high sequence for confusion, and the first couple of bars of 'the dambusters march' for boldly going forth!

Perhaps this is the key to getting my kids to use the electric toothbrush - i'll stick some funny eyes on it!

I am trying to create an AI architecture for robots, which is based on remembering past happenings. Maybe one of the side effects is, that situations are judged based on earlier experiences in similar situations, what probably can be seen as emotions.

Please have a look at my project: www.roboshock.de

Feedback very appreciated!

Just put "Desiree" (robot) up  on LMR. She likes to have the freedom to run. Doesn't mind having a space if nothing else is around, she hates when things get too close and she can't stand touching (anythimg). She can adjust her speed and cry (and spin around if she is really confused).

All this is implemented with a few variables, if-then's and a bit of randomness. 

She (all my favorite robots have a female name) works rather well. On occasion people have looked at her and ask "where is the remote control" they seem shocked that a robot could do all that by themselves.

Not sure if this is mood or personality, whatever, Desiree seems pretty succesful at it.

Virtual cigars for all! I am a proud pappa!

"Personality" is probably a better goal, as Danny indicates. The last thing I want is for Yubin Kun to get all weepy and tell me I'm not paying enough attention to him, or worse-to get fed up with me trying to teach him to recognize and pick up my socks and decide to see if he can get his gripper around the handle of my Ruger. Having him tell a joke or two at a party though- that's cool, but it doesn't take emotion (just watch Steven Wright. Of course, that example doesn't make the argument for personality either.) Perhaps a good example of what you're after is this: http://letsmakerobots.com/node/29105 Oddbot's puppy is relatively simple but due to clever programming and dynamic kinetics it has a high level of responsiveness and reactivity. It doesn't laugh or cry but it seems pretty alive for plastic and metal.