Let's Make Robots!

Wiring (beginners question)

As a total beginner I'm wondering what people use to connect Arduino's, motor controllers etc. etc.? I'm on the verge of buying some pre-made jumper wires (http://robosavvy.com/store/product_info.php/cPath/35/products_id/1178) for convenience more than anything else. But I'm wondering what more experienced people do? Do you make up your own jumpers from scratch? Some general advice/shared experience on wiring would be interesting.

Cheers

Huw

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i ordered and received these type of jumper, without try any circuit I just plug in the breadboard.

That look not really great, easy removing from the board, the "banana" connector are (I think) tooo small for the hole of the breadboard.  I didnt trust at all the electrical contact !!!!!

I never use that before, what is your advices about that ?

I use jumper wires all the time for testing circuits. Perhaps the only problem is that they can occasionally pull out of a breadboard or header if your robot is moving around a lot. If you are making something you want to be permanent then put a small dab of hot glue on each wire to keep it in place.

So pre-made jumpers are fine then? I'll order the Robosavvy ones later today - they seem like decent value.

:-)

Huw

 

 

the robosavvy set looks decent enough and as bird mentions "shorter is better" however those are seriously short and the only way to lenghen them would be to put a m/m between two f/f - and at that rate youll run out VERY quickly - myself id get a backup set of middle lengh (10-20 cm) from china/ebay - they come in very handy and will probably just turn up at your door when you suddenly realise youve run out

I have wads of both at hand. I do find myself using female jumpers with longer (2 sided) male header pin rails in Arduino projects more and more, mostly because the square shape and long runs of them seems to stabilize them a little more and keep them from popping out of the Female headers when a mobile platform runs into something.

Current capability of a conductor is actually determined by its CSA or cross sectional area. The AWG of a cable is related to its CSA.

Premade jumper wires should be fine unless you expect to carry more than an amp or so.

unless you are connecting high current draw motors, standard jumpers should be fine for a start. Shorter is better, meaning don't use the longest jumper because it is closer to your hand at the time you are assembling.

To give you a bit more info, the current handling capability of a given wire diameter is controlled by it's length. That is not to say that you should try to run 20A through a 25mm section of 20 gauge wire because I said it wouldn't matter. :P If you search online you will find suggested current handling capabilities of different wire gauges. It pretty much boils down to Ohms law (E / I * R or as I guess they teach it these days V / I * R) What Ohms law says is, if you want to solve for V then V = I * R or for I then I = V / R. V is for voltage in Volts, I is for current in Amps, R is for resistance in Ohms. Just for fun P = I * E or Power in watts = Current * Resistance.

I will let more experienced people give you more useful info ;)