Let's Make Robots!

Track and ... failed?

hi peeps

 

having gotten my new whiteboard and after being inspired by a certain robot  i decided to design my own tracks for my pet "akira".

 

Tadaaa!!!

 

 

 

oh yeah - and spending 3hrs disecting vhs video cassettes for the single metal bars you find in each one - eeesh.

anyway

the idea of these tracks is that even when glued together you have full choice of how many segments go into a track and the bars are also removeable - yet under no circumstances will they separate under movement (while they are on wheels they are fully stable)

the thing is...

ive never done any form of plastic cutting or 3d printing in my life

i'm assuming the images must be produced in a vector based program like inkscape or blender as the guy i talked to about his laser cutting machine says it runs on coral draw - but how do you tell the machine which order to cut things in? its no use cutting out a segment - having it fall out of the sheet - then trying to cut a hole in the segment. is it a colour coding or layer thing?

also having seen this im wondering if perhaps 3d printing is a smarter option than some guy at a sign shop cutting spare bits of plastic?

also also - what sort of costs should i be looking at (english pounds) for the various options - cos one of my main raasons for doing this was the fact i wanted this but couldnt afford it (creating my own tracks would be a good ego boost too tho ;)  )

 

in fact peeps - i'll take ANY advice you can give

thanks

dominic

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... that being said on the Z39 page you'll find the DXF files attached, as for the TB2 as bird mentioned it's on thingieverse. 

If you can get access to a laser cutter then ask CTC for the files he used to cut my Z39 tracks in plexy glass.

Oh and BTW thanks for crediting me :D 

Edit: And yes the approach Bird mentioned is propably the best to start with since you just need basic tools and patience to do it ;) 

TinHead has also printed his own tracks and made the model available on Thingiverse.

I might also suggest rather than making tracks with tools you don't possess you try something more along these lines. With that link you will see with a pair continuous chains you can make a single track. After making the tracks it is just a matter of setting up the road wheels to allow for proper ground contact.